Design Features for New Family of Banknotes


$2
Portrait

John Redman Bovell (1855-1928) was a scientist and agronomist and is credited with saving the sugar industry in Barbados.

In the 1880s the industry was being threatened by competition from European countries (sugar beet) as well as by drought conditions and disease that were affecting the sugar cane crop in the West Indies. In response to the threat, Bovell conducted experiments at his own expense on different varieties of cane, aban­doning the Bourbon variety, which was the most commonly used at the time, and working with the White Transparent variety.

His genetic experiments established Barbados as perhaps the leading cane breeding station in the Caribbean. In addition to his work with sugar cane, Bovell developed several strains of Sea Island cotton.

In 1908, John Redman Bovell was awarded the Imperial Service Star for his contribution to tropical agriculture.

Raised dot

Raised dot to help the blind identify the denomination. One dot equals $2.

The Coat of Arms of Barbados.

The Coat of Arms of Barbados.                                                                         

The map of Barbados

The map of Barbados with the location of the capital city, Bridgetown, highlighted.

The official launch date of the series

The official launch date of the series.                                                                         

The signature of the Governor

The Governor's signature.                                                                         

Morgan Lewis Windmill

Morgan Lewis Windmill was built in 1727 and operated until 1946. It was used to grind sugar cane for sugar production and could deliver up to 1,500 gallons of cane juice to the boiling house daily. After the mill stopped operating, it fell into disrepair, but in 1996 it was refurbished and has been preserved as a heritage site and tourist attraction, with the mill grinding occasionally to show Barbadians and visitors how sugar used to be made.

Security Features for New Family of Banknotes


Portrait Watermark
Portrait Watermark

John Redman’s Bovell’s face appears on the left of the note when it is held up to light. The image is also visible in reverse when the note is viewed from the back.

Number Watermark
Number Watermark

The number “2” appears beneath the portrait watermark when the note is held up to light. The image is also visible in reverse when the note is viewed from the back.

Broken Trident
Broken Trident Broken Trident

The white areas of the broken trident become tinted with blue when the note is held up to the light. Viewed from the back of the note, the missing areas of the broken trident are filled in.

Wave-like Thread
Wave-like Thread Wave-like Thread

Highly reflective bars that weave in and out of the paper become a complete line when the note is held up to light. Small text within the thread reads “CBB $2”.

Hidden Number
Hidden Number

The number “2” appears on the top right of the note when the note is tilted at certain angles.

UV Reactive Ink
UV Reactive Ink

The broken trident and the waves behind the map of Barbados glow under UV light.

Invisible Fibres
Invisible Fibres

Invisible fibres embedded in the paper glow blue-yellow-blue under UV light.

BACK
$2 note (John Redman Bovell)
$5 note (Sir Frank Worrell)

$10 note (Charles Duncan O'Neal)

$20 note (The Right Excellent Samuel Jackman Prescod)

$50 note (The Right Excellent Errol Barrow)

$100 note (The Right Excellent Sir Grantley Adams)

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